Monday, May 26, 2014

JSON Bond - episode 2

Following on in our series about data representation in the new neuroscience data exchange format BOND (Behavioral OpeN Data files), here are code samples showing how the basic file header as it appears in HVS Image 2014, can retain legacy experimental set-ups - something that we've had a lot of interest in.

"legacyheader":"{
"header":"CALVERS$,Maze_2014_Menu[2014.4] v2014.4.102",
"header":"FLDCOLOR,WHITE",
"header":"CAL_DATE,23:15, Tuesday, May 06, 2014",
"header":"CAL_USER,Undefined User",
"header":"FIELDXcm,050.00",
"header":"FIELDycm,050.00",
"header":"NORTHpix,012.000",
"header":"SOUTHpix,172.000",
"header":"WEST_pix,054.000",
"header":"EAST_pix,249.500",
"header":"Runtime...",
"header":"Version$,Maze_2014_Menu[2014.4] v2014.4.130",
"header":"TRIALIS$=Practice1_1.hvs",
"header":"TRACKER$=Microsoft LifeCam VX-6000",
"header":"ARENAIS$ = Open Field 4 cells",
"header":"XRANGEpx= 445",
"header":"ENDED_BY,Time",
"header":"RUNDATE$,18:38, Saturday, May 10, 2014",
"header":"RUNUSER$=Tester",
"header":"SUBJECT$ =mouse01",
"header":"DESCRIPT$=GroupA",
"header":"XCOORD__,YCOORD__",
"},


This is of course the legacy format that can replicate the complete old HSK formats and the pure BOND equivalent is simpler. Next week we'll move on to how the raw data is stored and displayed in the most future-proof, flexible, simple way.

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